Urban Transportation, Land Use, Air Quality, and Health

An interdisciplinary household survey in the city of Chengdu, led by Chris NIELSEN (Harvard-China Project), James HAMMITT (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), and SHEN Mingming and YAN Jie (School of Government, Peking University), was completed in July 2016. The data have been joined with an earlier dataset collected in a nearly identical Harvard-China Project-PKU survey in 2005, to cover changes in Chengdu's economy, urbanization, travel behavior, land use, air quality, and environmental health over 11 years. In addition to this multi-faceted research on Chengdu, the Project conducts additional individual studies of transportation, land use, emissions, air quality, and/or health at urban scale. 

Click on "More Publications" below for a full list of publications supported by the Harvard-China Project in this research area. 
 
Both the 2005 and 2016 Chengdu surveys collected data across a wide range of research interests, including transportation planning, travel behavior, mobile-source emissions, outdoor and indoor air pollution exposures, health effects of air pollution, and perceptions and valuation of health risk. Harvard researchers devised the questionnaires and are leading a number of parallel analyses. Covering 2000 households, field implementation of both surveys was led by political scientist Shen, using RCCC's rigorous geospatial sampling methods to insure inclusion of non-registered migrants left out of most social surveys in China.  
 
Joining Hammitt and Nielsen in ongoing analyses of the datasets are China Project research affiliates GUAN ChengHe (Graduate School of Design, Harvard), Sumeeta SRINIVASAN (Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Tufts University), WANG Haikun (School of Environment, Nanjing University), and GENG Fangli (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health).

Related Publications

Chenghe Guan. In Press. “Spatial distribution of high-rise buildings and its relationship to public transit development in Shanghai.” Transport Policy. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The relationship between dense urban development, often represented by high-rise buildings, and its location vis-à-vis metro stations reflects the connection between transportation infrastructure and land use intensity. Existing literature on high-rise buildings has focused either on developed countries or on cities where urban and public transit developments have occurred in an uncoordinated manner. This paper examines the following questions: What is the spatial proximity and spatial correlation between high-rise buildings and metro stations in different stages of development in various parts of the city? What were some of the factors that resulted in the observed patterns? The results suggest that buildings constructed after 2000 and buildings within the urban core/Shanghai Proper districts had a greater spatial proximity to the metro stations. However, the spatial correlation, measured by the number of high-rise buildings within a 500-meter buffer from the nearest metro stations and the time-distance to these stations, is stronger in the outer districts than in the urban core. These differences can be accounted for by Shanghai’s stages of urban development, the existence of metro infrastructure when high-rise development was undertaken, and the city’s land use policies. This case study sheds light on the relationship between high-density developments and metro systems in other large cities in China and other developing countries where rapid urban development coincides with the establishment of a comprehensive public transit system.

More Publications

Related News

Barbara Finamore

Will China Save the Planet? Book talk and discussion with Barbara Finamore

February 20, 2019

The Harvard Law School Library, along with the Harvard-China Project, East Asian Legal Studies, and the HLS Environmental Law Society, recently co-hosted Barbara Finamore, senior attorney and Asia senior strategic director at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), for a book talk and discussion on her latest release,...

Read more about Will China Save the Planet? Book talk and discussion with Barbara Finamore
More