Urban Transportation, Land Use, Air Quality, and Health

An interdisciplinary household survey in the city of Chengdu, led by Chris NIELSEN (Harvard-China Project), James HAMMITT (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), and SHEN Mingming and YAN Jie (School of Government, Peking University), was completed in July 2016. The data have been joined with an earlier dataset collected in a nearly identical Harvard-China Project-PKU survey in 2005, to yield a time series covering changes in Chengdu's economy, urbanization, travel behavior, land use, air quality, and environmental health over 11 years. In addition to this multi-faceted research on Chengdu, the Project conducts additional individual studies of transportation, land use, emissions, air quality, and/or health at urban scale. 

Click on "More Publications" below for a full list of publications supported by the Harvard-China Project in this research area. 
 
Both the 2005 and 2016 Chengdu surveys collected data across a wide range of research interests, including transportation planning, travel behavior, mobile-source emissions, outdoor and indoor air pollution exposures, health effects of air pollution, and perceptions and valuation of health risk. Harvard researchers devised the questionnaires and are leading a number of parallel analyses. Covering 2000 households, field implementation of both surveys was led by political scientist Shen, using RCCC's rigorous geospatial sampling methods to insure inclusion of non-registered migrants left out of most social surveys in China.  
 
Joining Hammitt and Nielsen in ongoing analyses of the datasets are China Project research affiliates GUAN ChengHe (Graduate School of Design, Harvard), Sumeeta SRINIVASAN (Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Tufts University), WANG Haikun (School of Environment, Nanjing University), and GENG Fangli (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health).

Related Publications

Chenghe Guan. 2018. “Urban form and digitalization of urban design.” Urban Planning International. Publisher's VersionAbstract
In the mid-18 Century, John Snow utilized spatial data analysis to trace the source of a cholera outbreak in London. His methods established the fundamental theory of using urban morphological study to solve practical urban issues. Accompanied by rapid innovation, technological improvement, and increasing computational power, urban morphology has been widely applied to digitalization of urban design. Through the urban form elements proposed by Kevin Lynch, this paper introduces the development of urban morphology in relation to digitalization of urban design in education, design practice and academic research. This paper adopts a variety of international case studies and discusses the importance of urban form and digitalization of urban design at a global scale.
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Financial Times Cites Recent China Project Study Exploring Environmental Implications of Electric Vehicle Charging in China

May 23, 2018

A Financial Times article examining the sometimes-ambiguous environmental benefits of electric vehicles in China, whose energy market has yet to fully transition out of being fossil fuel-dominated, cites the findings of a China Project study... Read more about Financial Times Cites Recent China Project Study Exploring Environmental Implications of Electric Vehicle Charging in China

China Project Spring 2018 Newsletter

China Project Spring 2018 Newsletter

May 22, 2018

This spring the Harvard-China Project continued its investigations of the “China 2030/2050” theme sponsored by the Harvard Global Institute (HGI). Our community explored a number of pressing issues, including a Nature Energy paper on the environmental implications of electric vehicle charging in China. The research, which offers a strategy for reducing CO2 emissions and improving air quality with electric vehicles in Beijing, was authored by a Harvard-Tsinghua...

Read more about China Project Spring 2018 Newsletter
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